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Find out more about White Buffalo Inc.  We've got a great team of biologists, educators and veterinarians who support research that is relevant in an environment heavily influenced by humans.

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Fertility Control Research

Fertility Control is strongly supported in many communities.
We've been a leader in this discipline for the last two decades.

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” Mt Storm Park, Cincinnati, Ohio:  We captured 41 females over six days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (December 2015).  

 

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” Village of East Hampton, New York:  We captured 114 females over 12 days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (January 2015).  We captured 46 females over eight days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies.  We also performed 50 vasectomies on males. (November 2015).  

 

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland:  We captured 24 females over three days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (December 2014).  We captured five females in one day using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (December 2015).  

 

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” Fairfax City, Virginia:  We captured 18 females over six days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies/tubal ligations (January/February 2014).  We captured 18 females over five days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies/tubal ligations (January 2015).  We captured six females over three days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies/tubal ligations (December 2015).  

 

“Field sterilization of black-tailed deer,” The Villages Golf and Country Club, San Jose, California:  We captured all females (99) over nine days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies/tubal ligations (January/February 2013).  We captured nine females using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (October 2013).  Population estimates were derived using local demographics and the known number of females in conjunction with Distance sampling surveys.  Detailed data on immigration and survival rates also were collected (Nov 2014).

 

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” Cayuga Heights, New York:  We captured 137 females (>97% of females present) over 14 days using a combination of drop nets and darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (December 2012). We captured all remaining females (n = 12) using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies. (December 2013).  Population estimates were derived using local demographics and the known number of females in conjunction with camera surveys at baited locations.  Detailed data on immigration and survival rates also were collected.

 

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” Wildlife Rescue, Phoenix, Maryland:  We captured 32 does over eight days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (February 2011).  We captured 14 does over five days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies (February 2012).  We captured nine does over three days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies. (February 2013 and 2014).  We captured 11 does over four days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies. (February 2015).  Population estimates were derived using local demographics and the known number of females in conjunction with direct observations at baited locations.  Data on immigration and survival rates also were collected.

 

“Evaluation of hand-injection versus dart administered GonaCon in female white-tailed deer,” Bridgeport, Connecticut: A research project to determine the relative efficacy of the GonaCon vaccine when administered via two different approaches (Jan.  2013 – Feb. 2014).

 

“Field sterilization of white-tailed deer,” Town and Country, Missouri:  We captured 100 does using a combination of drop nets and darting techniques and performed ovariectomies. (December 2009).  We captured 30 does over six days using darting techniques and performed ovariectomies. (December 2010).  Population estimates were derived using Distance sampling methods.

 

“Feasibility and efficiency of field sterilizations via tubal ligation/ovariectomy in female white-tailed deer,” Bridgeport, Connecticut: A research project to determine the relative efficiency of sterilization procedures compared to immunocontraceptive vaccines (2008 - 2011).

 

“Efficacy evaluation of the GonaConTM immunocontraceptive vaccine in fallow deer: an EPA pivotal field study,” Point Reyes National Seashore, California: This study is to be conducted as a requirement of the EPA authorization process for a New Animal Drug.  The primary objective is to verify the magnitude and duration of a single shot of GonaConTM on female fallow deer.  Seventy does were captured and treated.  (July 2007 – 2009).

 

“Efficacy evaluation of the GonaConTM immunocontraceptive vaccine in white-tailed deer: an EPA pivotal field study,” Giralda Farms, Madison, New Jersey: This study is to be conducted as a requirement of the EPA authorization process for a New Animal Drug.  The primary objective is to verify the magnitude and duration of a single shot of GonaConTM on female white-tailed deer. Sixty-six does were captured and treated.  (July 2005 – 2009).

 

“Experimental density maintenance using infertility agents of a suburban population of white-tailed deer following a reduction using sharpshooting techniques,” Newark, Delaware:  A research project to assess the utility of combining fertility control methods with lethal management options within a 600 acre privately owned facility.  Twenty-one deer were captured and 100 harvested. (August 2005 – 2008).

 

“Experimental control of a suburban population of white-tailed deer using immunocontraception,” Princeton Township, New Jersey:  A research project to assess the practicality and feasibility of reducing, then maintaining the local deer population, within a 3-mile2 area of town, at approximately 40/deer/mile2 using SpayVac and GonaConTM.  To date, 105 does have been captured and treated.  The first year’s funding was provided by White Buffalo, Inc.  (March 2003 – 2008).

 

“Evaluation of alternative PZP immunocontraceptive formulations in female white-tailed deer,” Bridgeport, Connecticut: A research project to determine the relative efficacy and longevity of various formulations of the PZP vaccine (June 2000 - 2007).

 

“Cost-effectiveness of maintaining an enclosed deer population using anti-fertility agents after an initial population reduction using sharpshooting techniques,” Duke Farms, Hillsborough, New Jersey:  A research project to assess the utility of combining fertility control methods with lethal management options within a 2700 acre privately owned facility.  Forty deer were captured and 221 harvested. (November 2004 – 2006).

 

“Experimental control of an urban population of white-tailed deer using contraception,” Cleveland, Ohio: A research project to assess the feasibility and practicality of using a contraceptive agent to reduce herd size in the Ohio and Erie Canal Reservation.  Over 300 deer captured.  Funding provided by the Cleveland Metroparks (March 2001 - 2005).

 

“Experimental control of an enclosed suburban population of white-tailed deer using contraception,” Bridgeport Connecticut: Designed and implemented a research protocol to assess the feasibility and practicality of using a contraceptive agent to maintain herd size (June 1999 - June 2000).

 

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Q. Why target females and not males for sterilization?

 

A.  The easiest answer is that bucks impregnate multiple does, so it is much more effective to prevent the does from reproducing. Each doe that is fertile represents 1-2 fawns/year. For each doe that is sterilized, you are guaranteed a reduction in the number of fawns. If the bucks are sterilized, and too many are missed or new males immigrate, then many of the females could become pregnant.

 

Targeting males may have some merit in isolated environments where most males can be accessed and immigration is severely limited.